International Nurse Regulator Collaborative meets in London

Published on 06 October 2022

The NMC hosted the International Nurse Regulator Collaborative (INRC) in London on 4 and 5 October, supporting the group to share best practice in professional regulation, for the benefit of our professions and the public we serve.

This latest annual meeting of the INRC aimed to share experiences of the regulatory response to Covid-19, and perspectives on the growing and increasingly mobile international workforce, among other topics. The collaborative meeting featured nine regulators, including the NMC and:

  • British Columbia College of Nurses and Midwives (BCCNM)
  • College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO)
  • Consejo General de Enfermería (CGE) (Spain)
  • National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) (United States)
  • Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia (NMBA)
  • Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland (NMBI)
  • Nursing Council of New Zealand (NCNZ)
  • Singapore Nursing Board (SNB).

Andrea Sutcliffe, NMC Chief Executive and Registrar, chaired the discussions. Andrea said:

“I’m delighted the NMC has been able to host this year’s meeting of the International Nurse Regulator Collaborative meeting, our first in-person meeting since 2019. This has been a wonderful opportunity for us to share insights, discuss our experiences of regulation during the Covid-19 pandemic, and highlight important pieces of work which we hope will benefit nursing and midwifery professionals.

“The last couple of years have shown the important impact nursing professionals make all around the world. International regulatory collaboration helps to ensure that nurses, no matter where they practise, can deliver the safe, effective and kind care people have the right to expect.

“My thanks to all those who took the time to attend this meeting and represent their organisation. Our discussions have been invaluable and show how working together can make such a positive difference.

“My thanks too for the NMC team who made sure everything ran smoothly and to the Florence Nightingale Museum for welcoming us for a special visit and tour which delighted our guests.”

David Benton, NCSBN Chief Executive Officer, said:

“The INRC is a wonderful example of how international collaboration and shared learning can benefit and improve nursing practice. I’m delighted to have taken part in the latest meeting and shared the NCSBN’s research, views, and ideas with fellow nursing regulators from around the world.

“This has also been a fantastic opportunity to hear about and understand the key issues surrounding other regulatory bodies. It’s important that regulators continue to work together to influence policy and protect the public's health, safety, and welfare on a global scale.”

INRC 2022.jpg

Pictured: Back row (l-r) Melissa Cooper, NMBA Associate Director; Carolyn Donahue, NMBI Director of Education, Policy and Standards; Alison Roots, Health and Management Planning Solutions; Essene Cassidy, NMBI President; Christian Beaumont, NMC International Policy Manager; Matthew McClelland, NMC Executive Director for Strategy and Insight; David Benton, NCSBN Chief Executive Officer; Catherine Byrne, NCNZ Chief Executive and Registrar; Phyllis Johnson, NCSBN Board of Directors President-elect; Sheila McClelland, NMBI Chief Executive Officer; Carol Trimmings, CNO Chief Quality Officer.

Front row (l-r) Jay Douglas, NCSBN Board of Directors President; Jose Serrano, CGE Vice President; Cynthia Johansen, BCCNM Registrar and Chief Executive Officer; Andrea Sutcliffe, NMC Chief Executive and Registrar; Christine Penney, BCCNM Chief Officer for Regulatory Policy and Programs; Ngaira Harker, NCNZ Chairperson; Tanya Vogt, NMBA Executive Officer.


Other recent news…

NMC pays tribute to those recognised in the King’s Birthday Honours list

Published on 14 June 2024

Congratulations to all the nursing and midwifery professionals who’ve been honoured this year.



NMC to recruit fitness to practise panel members and chairs

Published on 12 June 2024

We’re seeking to recruit 85 panel members and 55 chairs to reach timely, fair, and balanced decisions in fitness to practise cases.