UK-wide project will focus on professionalism in practice

CNOs and NMC highlight nursing and midwifery professionalism with new initiative

We will be working with Chief Nursing Officers (CNOs) from England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland on new resources defining what professionalism means to nurses and midwives.

The initiative will be underpinned by the NMC Code, highlighting the importance of professionalism in nursing and midwifery. It will be a valuable part of what revalidation and the Code represent in practice.

Read more in the statement below.

The Chief Nursing Officers (CNOs) alongside the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) will take forward a nationwide initiative to define what professionalism means in practice by focusing on the contribution of nurses and midwives. This work will be underpinned by the NMC Code, taking into account the impact of autonomous, competent, accountable practitioners and the difference they make to people's health and wellbeing. The initiative will be an important part of what the Code and revalidation mean in practice.

Professor Charlotte McArdle, Chief Nursing Officer for Northern Ireland, will be leading on this work on behalf of the CNOs.

Professionalism is the glue that unites practice and behaviour. Putting the public first is what nurses and midwives seek to do every day of their working lives. Delivering safe and effective practice, combined with a desire and commitment to continue to learn, are key elements of a number of components that make up professionalism.

Being an inspiring role model, in the best interests of people in your care, regardless of what position you hold and where you deliver care, is what really brings practice and behaviour together in harmony. We recognise professionalism as being that nurse or midwife that everyone looks up to in the toughest of circumstances – that person who develops and maintains resilience with a passion for providing excellent care, all of the time.

It is a responsibility of us all that we encourage and be a part of leading good practice, provide support to those who need help and challenge poor practice if we come across it. The public and the professions expect this and we will only deliver it if we continue to drive up standards and our commitment to professionalism.

Professionalism means something to all of us who work as nurses and midwives. So as we celebrate good practice, support improving practice and challenge poor practice, we uphold the standards of the professions for the good of the public.

 


Other recent news…

Plan to consult on ‘new era’ of midwifery education in the UK

Ambitious draft midwifery education standards have been outlined ahead of a proposed public consultation in early 2019.


NMC proposes changes to English language test

Proposed change to IELTS requirement to be considered by NMC’s Council next week


Blog: Yvonne Coghill

Yvonne Coghill, CBE, OBE is the director of the NHS Workforce Race Equality Standard (WRES) and Deputy President of RCN. She talks frankly about her route to th